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4 Ways to Celebrate Cinco de Mayo 2016 on One New York City Block

4 Ways to Celebrate Cinco de Mayo 2016 on One New York City Block


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If you’re looking for a little more than just the traditional “Mexican American” taco and margarita combo this year, try making a stop at not one, but four of the restaurants owned by the Pepe Group on New York City's West Fourth Street. Each pays homage to a different region, from Barcelona to Mexico.

“We feel that competition is healthy, even when it is amongst ourselves,” said Jimmy Sanz Jr., who has since taken over his father’s small empire. “By offering four different concepts we are able to specialize in the diverse interests of our customer base. Every concept is different and enjoys a different personality.”

Tio Pepe was the first on the West 4th Street scene in 1970, when Jimmy Sanz Sr. first fell in love with the property and bought it up. Forty-six years later, the restaurant still offers Spanish cuisine in a traditional restaurant setting, rooting its recipes in traditional Spanish recipes while continuing to evolve based on food trends springing up in other authentic Spanish kitchens. All of the Tapas selections are delicious, so don’t miss out on the Prince Edward mussels with garlic, olive oil, white wine and parsley; traditional toasted bread with Navarra tomatoes and garlic (amazingly, the bread doesn’t get soggy); Spanish octopus sautéed with garlic, paprika, and sea salt; or shrimp sautéed with garlic, olive oil, and white wine. The Coca Ibérica is also not to be missed, it’s a savory Spanish flatbread made with Serrano ham, manchego cheese, asparagus, and baby arugala.

The tapas offered at next-door’s Las Ramblas are similar, adding additional authentic dishes to the mix like roasted meatballs with garlic, manchego cheese, and lemon-oregano dressing; a classic Spanish omelet with alioli; Spanish peppers stuffed with morcilla, saffron rice, and manchego cheese; and grilled head-on-prawns with cava vinegar, ginger, and basil. The eatery is modeled after Barcelona tapas bar, serving 28 Spanish wines by the glass and craft beer to go with their small bites.

If it’s authentic Mexican tacos you’re truly after, walk three paces over to Burrito Loco, which offers south-of-the-border cuisine served over the sounds of mariachi music, set against a backdrop of stained glass windows, and decorated with antique photos. Try the Carnitas Michocacanas, baked pork chunks marinated with citrus, fine herbs, and served with tomatillo sauce and tortillas on the side; and any variety, of its burritos made with ground beef, steak, chicken, or shrimp, served with mole sauce, tomatillo, queso fresco, and a side of rice and beans. From 4-7 p.m. every day (except Saturday), margaritas, wines by the glass, sangria, and piña coladas are just five bucks a pop.

Finally, downstairs is the blink-and-you’ll-miss-it Taco Shop, where traditional masks hang from the ceiling, upbeat music swells against the walls, and beautifully presented and inexpensively priced tacos await. Authentic Mexican ingredients and a touch of post-Mexico culinary fusion give diners a true Mexico City taquería experience. Enjoy short rib, baja fish, slow cooked pork, and fresh guacamole, for a total steal! Take advantage of their happy hour special, where you can land 3 tacos and a margarita or beer for $12, Monday through Friday from 3-7 p.m.

For more New York City dining and travel news, click here.

Disclosure: We were invited in for a couple of tastings.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


An Edible History in One New York Tenement

This is a book filled with culinary nostalgia. It is about sharing the details of immigrant food and life in one building – 97 Orchard – the melding aromas of customs, traditions and history in a densely populated area.

It is part text book explaining how the Eastern Europeans, Germans, Irish, Russians and Italians forged a new life in cramped quarters in the lower east side and how their foods became familiar to and part of the American palate. It is also a compelling story of day–to–day life at 97 Orchard cramped quarters, no running water, no indoor plumbing, shared joys and miseries among these new “Americans” who primarily came to America through Ellis Island.

Life was hard, money scarce, but food was plentiful and creatively sourced. Due to lack of refrigeration and funds, it was not unusual for a cook to purchase just one egg for a recipe.

The Eastern Europeans established poultry farms in the neighborhood and “amazingly, immigrants raised geese in tenement yards, basements, hallways, and apartments. transplanting a rural industry to the heart of urban America." Pigs too wandered the streets, introduced by Irish immigrants. In 1842, the city was home to roughly 10,000 wandering pigs.By 1852 the figure had doubled! The waft of Irish breads filled the building Ziegelman tells of an Italian woman who foraged the area for wild dandelion greens. Hester street became a “full blown pushcart market” open every day except Saturday.

Bagels, pickles, sauerkraut, knishes, hot dogs, saloons, pizza all came to America with the immigrants.

Jane Ziegelman shares photos, recipes and the history of this time gone by, and reminds us how influential the lower east side was, and is, to our current daily lives.

KosherEye suggests this book as a "gift yourself and gift others" selection – so appropriate for your holiday hostess. And, even better, bring one of the recipes!

If you are in NYC, we highly recommend a visit to the Tenement Museum, at 97 Orchard. What a memorable experience – we have been there! The authenticity of Ziegelman’s book will come to life as you tour the actual restored apartments. Read the book, gift the book, prepare a recipe, and then go!

Enjoy the following original vintage recipes: Stuffed Cabbage, Challah, and Krupnik (Bean Soup). 97 Orchard can be ordered at Amazon.com.

To our KosherEye readers: We would love to hear from you! Please share your family’s heirloom recipes with us.


Watch the video: Cinco de Mayo: An American Holiday open captioned (June 2022).