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Too Much Coffee? No Such Thing, According to Science

Too Much Coffee? No Such Thing, According to Science



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We’re about to seriously enable your coffee addiction

istockphoto.com

Coffe number four? Your body's cool with it if your wallet is.

You know how the science was always kind of wishy-washy about whether coffee was good or bad for your health? Well, scientists in the U.K. assessed the data from over 220 studiesyes, that much research has been done on coffee — and came to one decisive conclusion: The benefits of drinking coffee far outweigh the risks.

Coffee drinkers lowered their risk of liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, dementia, and some cancers. Despite the correlation between caffeine and stress, coffee drinkers were also less likely to die from stroke.

Caffeine from any source is also known to improve lung function, help glucose metabolism in the gut, boost athletic performance, and provide partial migraine relief.

This is good news for humanity. Life without coffee would look a lot different than our lives do today. According to the International Coffee Organization, over 2 billion cups of coffee are consumed daily. Can you imagine having to rely on alternatives to caffeine in the morning for energy? The thought has us wanting to sprint to our favorite coffee shop for a satisfying cup of joe.

However, the researchers warn against jumping too far with their conclusions. “Findings of our umbrella review should be interpreted with caution,” warned Robin Poole, who was involved in the study. “Evidence in the review came mainly from observational research, so we can’t extrapolate our findings to suggest people start drinking coffee or increasing their intake in attempts to become healthier.”

Of course, if you’re buying extremely sugary drinks from Starbucks, those health benefits are basically moot. Researchers recommend drinking your coffee black — or at least using one of the healthiest creamers for your cup.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.


[Question] What's the Hubbub with Geisha Coffee?

While looking at some top-rated coffees and some of the specialty stuff offered by my local shops, I've seen "Geisha" pop up quite often.

Is this the holy grail of coffee? Have you had some? What was your experience like?

Geisha or Gesha is an heirloom variety coffee that originates from Ethiopia. It was brought to Central America because it was rust resistant, but it didn't produce as much coffee, so it went by the wayside. Quantity was desired over quality, until the 3rd wavers showed up. The variety of coffee was "rediscovered". In 2013 a specific variety went for $350 a pound (http://en.centralamericadata.com/en/article/home/Panamanian_Geisha_Coffee_Bought_for_350_Per_Pound).

I had Panama Geisha, and it was the best cup of coffee I've ever had. It had an amazing fruitiness, comparable to peaches.

My local roaster carried "Costa Rica Palmilera Geisha" for the last couple months. Again, it was an amazing cup of coffee.

Taste is subjective. So, it is hard to know if a certain coffee is worth it until you try it.

Tomatoes are a good comparison. There are many varieties of tomatoes. Industrialized tomatoes tend to look pretty good, but have barely an flavor. An heirloom variety tomato that was grown in your neighbor's garden most likely tastes amazing.

One of my favorite things about coffee is the variety, and being able to experience different varieties grown in different regions.

Additionally, one of the reasons the gesha was planted by Hacienda La Esmeralda, was that the tree was known to do well in poor planting conditions. There was a patch of rocky soil on a steep slope where other coffee cultivars tended to do poorly, where they decided to plant gesha and see what happened. The reason this crop in particular had excelled was that it was high grown, as opposed to crops grown at lower altitude simply for rust resistance and to add to bulk coffee output, where gesha had been exclusively used before. These circumstances, combined with La Esmeralda's ability to recognize the excellent coffee the trees produced, led to that first crop of gesha that sold for a ridiculous amount at auction.

Source: God in a Cup: The Obsessive Quest for the Perfect Coffee by Michaela Weissman. (This is coming from memory so please correct me if I'm wrong)

Give it a couple more years and you'll see it everywhere. The price will be much more reasonable. Growers all over Central America are growing it in hopes of cashing in on the craze. There are some nice ge(i)shas out there. But not for the price. Get a killer Ethiopia instead!

Is this the holy grail of coffee?

No such thing, too much subjective.

Geisha comes close, though. It's a perfect storm of "genuinely great coffee" and "HYPE. " in the same way Yirgacheffe was the be-all and end-all a few years ago.

It's good, its a lot of work to grow, and that work is rewarded with great beans. But it's a specific strain of plant, nothing more or less, and the name alone is hardly a guarantee.

The one I had was pretty damn awesome, mind. Quite resilient to roasting parameters, delicious at most profiles, and carrying an unusual diversity of easily noted flavour complexity. On the downside, not enough "coffee" taste according to most of my sample group, and crazy expensive to obtain.

Geishas / Geshas garner a premium because they produce an extremely complex cup of coffee that has a very low acidic taste from a very limited number of farms. Think floral and sweet from a typical Ethiopian but x100 this is really odd for a Central American varietal, which are usually far more robust, with lots of caramel / chocolate / earthy flavors. These flavors can be so intense that it almost doesn't taste like coffee anymore. Pulling taste notes out of a cup can be both easy (because it's so intense) and overwhelming (because there are so many). It's really fun to drink because you just want to keep tasting the crazy flavors swirling around in your mouth. It's also fairly well rounded: all the Geshas I've had have had a decent bottom, so it doesn't just taste like a boiled flower in your mouth brewed in a Chemex.

As an example, I had my friend try an Intelligentsia Gesha two years ago and on his first sip, his eyes almost bugged out of his head while he was literally processing it in his head. I told him to drink it black at first, which he did, though he did want to try it with a little sugar he said it actually ruined the cup (thankfully just the last bits of it) because it tasted like the Gesha and then a distinct taste of just sugar - it didn't mix well. He usually puts a little sugar / cream in his coffee, so the fact that he preferred it without should say something.

It's not the holy grail or anything but it's a very distinct coffee experience. I can even see why some people wouldn't like it because as I mentioned above, its almost NOT coffee tasting sometimes with all those flavors. It's also so complex in flavor that whenever I have some I really have to sit down and enjoy it, not just brew some and go work or whatever.