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Food & Wine Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Food & Wine Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary


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Make your tomato juice blend one day in advance to really allow the flavors to marinate

Seriously — why would you ever buy pre-made Bloody Mary mix? The true highlight of this brunch cocktail is its freshness, and this beautiful party cocktail proves it.

This recipe is courtesy of Drizly.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Cup peeled, finely-grated fresh horseradish
  • 2 Ounces Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 Ounces Sriracha chile sauce
  • Finely grated zest of 1 small lemon
  • 2 Teaspoons celery salt
  • 1 Teaspoon kosher salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 32 Ounces tomato juice
  • 16 Ounces vodka
  • Lime wedges
  • Pickled or fresh vegetables (optional)

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment

Flavor Cocktail

The original martini, allegedly invented in the U.S. in the 1860s, was made with sweet vermouth. One of the first recipes for a dry martini, made with dry vermouth, appeared in Frank P. Newman’s 1904 American Bar.

Hidetsugo Ueno currently uses the exquisite French Dolin rouge vermouth in his Negronis, but you may want to experiment with different sweet vermouths—Martini & Rossi, Cinzano, Carpano Antica Formula—or try a bittersweet one like Punt e Mes.Go to Negroni recipe

The origin of this classic rum cocktail is one of the great debates in tikidom. Both Ernest Beaumont-Gantt (a.k.a. “Donn Beach,” the father of tiki culture) and Trader Vic founder Victor Bergeron lay claim to its invention. This version borrows from Beaumont-Gantt’s recipe, which adds dashes of Pernod and Angostura bitters for complexity.

Mixologists around the world make this fizzy, lemony drink with gin, but New Orleans bartenders opt for cognac.

Manhattan Cocktail

This Manhattan reflects the recipe in America’s first cocktail book, 1862’s The Bon Vivant’s Companion, by Jerry Thomas. It calls for more vermouth than rye—the opposite of the modern Manhattan.

Go to Manhattan Cocktail recipe.

Dark ‘n Stormy

According to a Gosling’s Rum tale, this drink was invented more than 100 years ago when members of Bermuda’s Royal Naval Officer’s Club added a splash of the local rum to their spicy homemade ginger beer. They described its ominous hue as “the color of a cloud only a fool or dead man would sail under.”

Go to Dark ‘n Stormy recipe

When New Orleans bartender Chris McMillian mixes mint juleps at Bar UnCommon, he recites an ode, written in the 1890s by a Kentucky newspaperman, that calls the cocktail “the zenith of man’s pleasure…the very dream of drinks.”

Robert Vermeire’s 1922 book Cocktails: How to Mix Them attributes the sidecar to the celebrated bartender MacGarry, who worked at London’s Buck&339s Club.

As the story goes, Ernest Beaumont-Gantt created this potent drink in the 1930s and named it for its mind-altering effect after a friend consumed three of them. This lower-proof version is made with Velvet Falernum, an almond-and-lime-flavored liqueur that’s a key ingredient in many tiki drinks.

The best kind of cola to use in this drink is Mexican Coca-Cola (available at amazon.com) or another brand made with cane sugar. Sugar-based colas have a crisper, cleaner flavor than the more readily available ones made with high-fructose corn syrup.

Limoncello Collins

The Collins was most likely named after 19th-century bartender John Collins of London’s Limmer’s Hotel. The Tom Collins was originally made with Old Tom, a sweet style of gin that’s extremely hard to find today.

Go to Limoncello Collins recipe

Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary

Bartender Anna Vanderzee at the Spotted Pig in New York City suggests making the mix for this recipe one day in advance to allow the spices and horseradish to marry with the tomato juice.

Go to Zee Spotted Pig Bloody Mary recipe

Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha

Sweet, tart and strong, the caipirinha is mixed with the Brazilian spirit cachaça. Cachaça is similar to rum but made from sugarcane rather than molasses. “It’s more sophisticated than rum because it’s more pure,” says Brazilian artist Vik Muniz, patriotically.

Go to Daniel Boulud’s Caipirinha recipe

Hemingway Daiquiri

In his 2001 book Straight Up or On the Rocks, William Grimes claims that Ernest Hemingway “often worked his way through about a dozen of these lime slurpees, sometimes ordering doubles, which became known as Papa Dobles.”

Go to Hemingway Daiquiri recipe.

The national cocktail of Chile and Peru, this drink may have evolved from the Pisco Punch, which was all the rage in San Francisco during the 1849 gold rush.

The oldest-known recipe for the mojito appeared as the Mojo de Ron in a 1929 Cuban guide called Libro de Cocktail (The Cocktail Book).

Pimm’s Cooler

Pimm’s Cups are traditionally made with lemonade, lemon soda, ginger ale or ginger beer and are garnished lavishly with cucumber, mint leaves and fruit. Former Barmarché bar manager Ben Scorah’s version incorporates Creole Shrubb, an orange liqueur made in Martinique.

Go to Pimm’s Cooler recipe.

Champagne Cocktail

At the revamped Merchants restaurant in a 118-year-old Nashville building, suspender-clad mixologists serve old-school drinks like this one from the mid-19th century.

Go to Champagne Cocktail recipe.

May 7, 2012 gamessoccer Leave a comment


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