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Toasty!: Bakeable Kit Kats Released in Japan

Toasty!: Bakeable Kit Kats Released in Japan


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New Japanese Kit Kat store will release bakeable Kit Kats that are meant to be heated in a toaster oven like Pop Tarts

This isn't your typical Kit Kat. this is what baked Kit Kats look like when you take them out of the oven.

Pop Tarts aren’t the only sweet snack that you can pop in the toaster oven.

The new Japanese Kit Kat store in Tokyo will soon be serving bakeable Kit Kat bars called “Bake ‘N Tasty Mini Kit Kats.” The chocolate bars, available in Japan starting next week, come in the typical chocolate wafer flavor as well as a new custard pudding flavor according to Japanese culture blog Rocket News 24.

So how does it work? Japanese patisserie Yasumasa Takagi told Rocket News 24 that the sugar content of the Kit Kats, when heated in a toaster, “hardens into a solid candy-like state faster than the chocolate on the surface melts, resulting in a chocolate and wafer biscuit combination with a texture resembling a cookie and a sweet caramelized smell.”

It only takes about two minutes to heat up these sweet innovations and a pack of these Kit Kats cost about $5 U.S. dollars. Unfortunately, no word on if these snacks are coming stateside anytime soon. This isn't the only unusual junk food to come from Japan. The Daily Meal recently wrote about new spaghetti-flavored ice pops.

Joanna Fantozzi is an Associate Editor with The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @JoannaFantozzi.


Kit Kat May Introduce 6 New Flavors in 2020

And that's in addition to Apple Pie and Birthday Cake, which have been confirmed for next year already.

Kit Kat is popular the world over for their crispy layers wrapped in creamy chocolate. Japan has dozens of flavors you won&apost find in America, like Green Tea and Banana. Stateside introductions like Pumpkin Pie Kit Kat and Mint Dark Chocolate are roundly welcomed by the candy&aposs fans. Now, the Hershey-owned company is enticing their loyal candy cravers with hints of new flavors to come.

In 2020, Kit Kat is already set to release an Apple Pie-flavored barਊnd a਋irthday Cake-flavored bar, but the sugary rumor mill says there could be six more Kit Kat varieties for 2020, making a half dozen new flavors in total to look forward to.

As for the six flavors, it&aposs rumored they will be Chocolate Cream Pie, Orange Creamsicle, Cotton Candy, and Cherry Cola, according to Instagram account @markie_devo, who found a photo of the four potential flavors at Walmart. More recently, they also shared a leak that suggests Sweet Potato Pie and Blueberry Pie Kit Kats could be happening, too. That&aposs 8 new flavors in one year. We&aposre not worthy!

It&aposs unclear when the new Kit Kat candies be on shelves. It&aposs likely, however, these will be limited-edition releases, so be sure to grab a few if and when you see them.


Bakeable Kit Kats On Pizza May Have Just Ruined Our Two Favorite Foods

When Nestle released its new bakeable Kit Kats, we were intrigued but also kind of afraid. Now that we know how people are using them, we're really afraid.


NAPOLI NO KAMA

Rocket News reports that a number of Japanese pizza chains are offering pizzas made with the "Bake ‘N Tasty Mini Kit Kats Custard Pudding Flavor." The bakeable Kit Kats were released in Japan on March 24, and just a few days later pizza chains like Napoli no Kama and Strawberry Cones are featuring the things on their menus.

We're having a tough time wrapping our heads around the concept, and learning more about the pizzas isn't helping. For one, apparently the Kit Kats go UNDERNEATH the cheese.


NAPOLI NO KAMA

Additionally, the custard pudding flavored Kit Kats are being paired with mango, gorgonzola and honey maple.

Rocket News reports that Napoli no Kama started selling Kit Kat and Mango Dolce Pizza last Friday. The pizza is topped with the bakeable Kit Kats, mango slices, mixed nuts, gorgonzola cheese sauce and honey maple sauce. Strawberry Cone's pizza, the Baked Kit Kat and Mango Dessert Pizza, contains the same ingredients.


FACEBOOK/STRAWBERRY CONE

We're afraid but also very confused. Kit Kats might be the perfect candy and pizza might be the perfect food, but together they could ruin each other forever. If anyone gets their hands on one of these pizzas, please let us know how they taste!

Want to read more from HuffPost Taste? Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Tumblr.


Japan’s latest Kit Kat release tastes like maple leaf-shaped red bean cakes!

One of the best things about travelling around Japan is the chance to stock up on local Kit Kats, released in a variety of unique and interesting flavours. Now there’s a brand new Kit Kat ready to tantalise your tastebuds on your travels to Hiroshima, featuring the unique flavour of the area’s most famous specialty souvenir, the Momiji Manju.

What makes this release even more special is the fact that it was created in collaboration with Takatsudo, the famed 100-year-old family-run business that originally created the Momiji Manju back in 1906. Though many shops now sell the maple leaf-shaped cakes today, Takatsudo’s remain incredibly popular for their home-baked dough and carefully prepared red bean jam. Kit Kat acknowledges their collaboration with the esteemed bakery by incorporating the store’s distinctive deer logo and font on the front of their new boxed packages.

Located on the island of Miyajima, Takatsudo’s signature sweet can now be enjoyed throughout Hiroshima and the greater Chugoku and Shikoku regions of Japan in the form of a Kit Kat chocolate. According to Nestlé Japan, the red bean paste has been kneaded into the wafers, while the flavour of manju (sweet dumpling) dough has been incorporated into the white chocolate mix. The sweet is topped off with a gorgeous maple leaf symbol, making for a unique souvenir of the area.

The new Kit Kats, released on 3 October, come in a 5-pack for 350 yen (US$3.38) or a 12-pack for 800 yen. With each chocolate being individually wrapped, these make great souvenirs for people back home!


With three cute box designs and adorable individual wrappers, this is the best way to send wishes for a lucky New Year.

Nestlé Japan is known for its wide range of unusual Kit Kats, which come in a variety of unusual flavours and special local releases, but sometimes, at the end of the year, it’s the original chocolate wafer that becomes one of their most sought-after products. The Japanese tradition of giving “otoshidama” money gifts at New Year is one that often involves envelopes featuring auspicious symbols or Chinese zodiac animals, and Nestlé has been combining the custom with the popular “Kit Kat Otoshidama” for the past seven years. The company recently announced their lineup for 2017, and the adorable packaging features a cute bird character to mark the upcoming Year of the Rooster.

▼ The boxed packages come in three designs, including a rooster cosplaying as an eggplant…

▼ A rooster dressed up as Mt Fuji…

▼ And a rooster on the back of a hawk.

Why the bizarre choice of rooster outfits? These images – Mt Fuji, hawk, and eggplant – are the top three auspicious symbols Japanese people hope to see in “hatsuyume“, their first dream of the New Year.

▼ Hopefully, if you stare at the back of the packet for long enough, you can have all three lucky symbols appear in your dream on the first night of the New Year!

Kit Kats have become popular as lucky gifts during times of celebration and exam periods, due to the fact that the brand holds connotations of luck in its name, given that its sounds similar to the Japanese phrase “Kitto katsu“, which means “You’ll surely win”.

The three individually wrapped chocolates inside the New Year’s boxes add even more luck to the mix with the words “Daikichi” or “Excellent luck” written across them, along with a rooster dressed as a Shinto priest, holding an Ōnusa paper shaker, used during purification rituals.

▼ The wrappers also include wishes for things like “surely a prosperous New Year” and a “New Year that’s surely special”.

The Kit Kats are even more exclusive due to the fact that they’re released in conjunction with Japan Post, meaning they can only be bought from local post offices for a limited time. The 2017 Kit Kat Otoshidama retail for 140 yen (US$1.35) each and will be available from 1 November to 6 January, so be sure to step inside a post office to pick up one of the boxes if you’re in Japan during that time!


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Some of the first businesses to take advantage of the new treat were pizza chains Napoli no Kama and Strawberry Cones, who sought permission from Nestle to use Kit Kat Bakes in their recipes.

It is thought the idea is to create a kind of 'desert pizza' that perfectly balances the heavily salted flavour of the cheese popular on Japanese pizzas with sweet and crunchy Kit Kat Bakes.

According to Rocket News 24, Napoli no Kama started selling the first Kit Kat pizzas on Friday at 1,630 Yen for a medium size.

Creative: Kit Kat pizzas (right) are by no means the strangest the Napoli no Kama chain sells. The recipe sits comfortably alongside current favourites Fresh Caramel Banana Chocolate and Nuts with extra whipped cream

Before: When cooked the Kit Kate bake transforms from a slightly unappetising pale stick into a crispy biscuit

And after: It is thought the idea is to create a kind of 'desert pizza' that perfectly balances the heavily salted cheese popular on Japanese pizzas with sweet and crunchy Kit Kat Bakes (pictured)

They are by no means the strangest sweet pizza the Napoli no Kama chain sells however, sitting comfortably alongside items flavours inclduing Fresh Caramel Banana Chocolate and Nuts with extra whipped cream, and Honey, Maple and Gorgonzola.

This isn't the first time Nestle has worked with Takagi on a Kit Kat product.

In January it was revealed that the companies were jointly launching a 'Kit Kat boutique' - a Tokyo store that sells weird and wonderful versions of the snack that can't be purchased anywhere else.

Among the varieties launched to cater for Japanese tastes were Sublime Bitter, Special Sakura Green Tea and Special Chilli.

Nestle Japan introduced the KitKat Bake on March 24 under the slogan 'Have a bake, have a Kit Kat'. The company worked with Japanese confectioner Takagi to produce a bar that can be cooked in the oven

The Kit Kat Bake packaging describes how the product can be eaten raw or cooked in an oven for two minutes

The Japanese market already has a number of popular Kit Kat flavours that can't be found elsewhere, including Purple Potato, Cinnamon Cookie, European Cheese, Bean Cake and Wasabi

Kit Kats are one of the most popular chocolate bars in the world, with one consumed every second on average.

In Japan, however, the chocolate snack has taken on a whole new level of popularity, massively outselling every other bar for the last two years.

The Japanese market already has a number of popular flavours that can't be found elsewhere, including Purple Potato, Cinnamon Cookie, European Cheese, Bean Cake and Wasabi.

These bars come in a variety of colours, ranging from traditional dark chocolate to pinks and lilacs.


Have a Break, Have a Kit Kat!

The Kit Kat was introduced in August of 1935, by Rowntree’s, a candy company based in York, England. Today, it is owned by Nestlé, a world famous chocolate brand.

Kit Kats are a type of chocolate that is made up of three layers of wafers. The wafers are covered with a layer of chocolate inside and out. Each whole piece is considered a “finger.” Each package of Kit Kats usually has either one, two, or four fingers connected together.

The name of this delicious candy comes from the Kit Kat club, which is named after Christopher Catling. Catling would hold a famous political and literary club in his London pie shop in the 17th century.

The red and silver design has maintained consistency since the Kit Kat’s debut except for one small period in time. In 1942, the wrapper was changed to blue to portray the change in recipe that resulted from a shortage of fresh milk. However, as availability of milk slowly increased, the red logo made its perpetual return in 1949.

Kit Kat became an international treat in the 1950’s. The brand started expanding to countries such as South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. Television greatly expanded the brand as well. In 1958, advertising agent Donald Gillies from JWT of London introduced the classic phrase, “Have a break, have a Kit Kat,” in a few commercials and press campaigns. Today, it is the brand’s registered trademark.

Different countries around the world have different variations of the Kit Kat. Here in America, we have milk, white, or dark chocolate, along with a few seasonal flavors. But Japan has over 200 different kinds! Japan has exciting flavors such as soy sauce, corn, green beans, miso, cherry, green tea, and yubari melon. Japan even created a bakeable Kit Kat, which is covered in dough and filled with flavors such as pudding and cheesecake.

Kit Kats will always be at the top of my list. I absolutely love their chocolate taste that just melts in my mouth along with the crunchy, crispy wafers. As my teeth chew down onto the wafer, the chocolate fills my mouth. This makes the Kit Kat quite unique compared to other chocolates, which are usually either plain, with a nougat, with caramel, with peanuts, or some combination of those variations.

So after a long day of classes, “Have a break! Have a Kit Kat!”

Fun Fact: In the Untied States, the Hershey Company has special permission to produce Kit Kats.


18 Outrageously Awesome Kit Kat Flavours You Probably Haven't Tried

KitKat has just released a pumpkin pie flavoured bar — but the U.S.-only release means Canadians will have to stick to their cookie dough chunkys and KitKat classics for a while longer (sigh). While Kit Kat’s Canadian candy-makers have been upping their confectionary game with spin-off flavours of their signature bars like orange, cookie dough and cookies and cream, we’re still pretty far behind the curve when it comes to flavour options.

The name Kit Kat sounds like the phrase “kitto katsu to” in Japanese, which roughly translates to “sure to win.” As a result, the chocolate bars have become a token of good luck that are given as gifts to friends and family, particularly to students about to write final exams. (According to Nestle, one in three Japanese students buys one before an exam.)

Thanks to the Kit Kat’s popularity in Japan, flavours there have become a lot more inventive. Here are just a few of the Kit Kat flavours available in the world that we’d like to break us off a piece of. (Well, maybe not the cough syrup one.)

Choco banana

A little fruit, a little chocolate, sounds like a perfectly well-balanced snack.

Baked Potato

Maybe it’s like a chocolate-covered potato chip?

Cookies and Cream

This Canadian exclusive can help to fill the pumpkin-spice void.

Cheers to alcohol-infused chocolate bars!

Wasabi

This sushi condiment has made the leap to dessert territory.

Red velvet

Your favourite cupcake flavour, now in chocolate-bar form.

Hokkaido Melon

A mixture of sweet melon and mascarpone cheese sandwiched between thin wafers. Mind blown.

Matcha

Get the clarity and focus of this favourite morning drink all wrapped up in one bite.

Pumpkin pie

Just in time for Fall, get your pumpkin fix encased in a crunchy biscuit and pumpkin creme-filled delight.

Cheesecake

Perfect to have on hand for when your cheesecake cravings strike.

Fruit parfait

This flavour could technically be considered breakfast, don’t you think?

Adzuki Bean

Adzuki bean jelly, a traditional Japanese dessert, gets the chocolate treatment.

Pancake

A breakfast favourite created as Easter special edition, we’re dying to try these mini bars.

Purple Taro

Still trying to figure out how they got sweet potato in there? Us too.

Cough Syrup

A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.

Cranberry Almond

Feeling fancy? Treat yourself to a Kit Kat studded with almonds and dried cranberries.

Chunky Cookie Dough

Roasted Tea

Tea-infused chocolate coats crispy wafers for a tea-time with zero brewing required.


Conclusion

Japan took the modest Kit Kat and ran, making it a product that both locals and travelers love, even if the travelers already have Kit Kats in their home countries. Are you one of the few enthusiasts who has journeyed around Japan in search of the rare and collectible Kit Kat flavors? Were you intrigued by some of those flavors, or were you appalled? What's the best Kit Kat flavor, according to you? Be sure to try as many flavors as you can the next time you can get your hands on some Japan-only Kit Kats!

If you want to give feedback on any of our articles, you have an idea that you'd really like to see come to life, or you just have a question on Japan, hit us up on our Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram!


First ever Easter Kit Kats in Japan feature 13 types of carrot-flavoured cuteness

Kit Kats in Japan are well-known for their creative designs and flavors, including limited releases for annual events and holidays such as Christmas, Halloween and even the cherry blossom viewing season.

Until now, there was one special holiday that always went unnoticed: Easter. This year, Nestle Japan are releasing their first ever Easter range, with a clever play on words that ties the religious festival to the month of April, the start of the Japanese school and business year.

According to Nestle, Easter is an "ii sutaato," which means “good start” in Japanese. And with these gorgeous apple pie and carrot flavored chocolates on the market, it looks like it’s going to be a very good start indeed.

On sale now for 540 yen, the mini Kit Kats come in a pack of 12 and feature cute bunny packaging.

For the first time in the company’s 42-year history in Japan, bunnies will appear on the chocolates. There will be 13 different designs in total, although it’s not guaranteed that all of them will be in one pack, which means we may have to indulge in a spot of bunny hunting to collect them all.

To top it all off, one in every 30 chocolates will feature this special Lucky Easter design. Unfortunately the only prize for finding this is the actual chocolate itself.

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Limited edition triple-size Lotte pie snack is so popular, we’re unable to get our hands on them -- Bake and feast — We try the new bakeable Kit Kats -- Hot and sweet — these new Kit Kats are ready to be baked!

14 Comments Login to comment

Warispeace

Consumers need more information to make good ethical decisions about what products to purchase and the distant impacts of their actions. This Kit Kat bar may look cute but not taste as sweet if we know how it is made. For example, there is a case against Nestle because it, and some other large chocolate makers, have not fulfilled their promise to make sure their products are not made with slave labour in Africa. Nestle and other companies have tried to say they are not responsible because they do not directly purchase coca from farms that use child slaves (they instead use suppliers who purchase from these farms), but it would be unreasonable to think that they don't know that this practice is part of their chain of supply.

Pukey2

Raymond Chuang

We'll never see KitKat products like this in the USA because Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible.

Seawolf

Looks like more and more companies are trying to make some financial gain in a rather quiet season. Last year it was Disney resorts (and I think some other product as well, but can't remember), now we have KitKat, also, what is it with the price, that would be double the usual one?

Therougou

We'll never see KitKat products like this in the USA because Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible.

I prefer it that way. I wish companies would just provide quality products for a decent price, instead of trying to make a profit by force-feeding limited editions every 2 weeks.

I prefer it that way. I wish companies would just provide quality products for a decent price

Hershey. The company whose only response to competition from superior products is to try and ban its rivals?

The Hershey recipe has a lower fat content, a less creamy texture and, British chocolate fans insist, an inferior taste. http://time.com/3683147/cadbury-chocolate-america-britain-hershey/

Therougou

Hershey. The company whose only response to competition from superior products is to try and ban its rivals?

I didn't mention anything about Hershey, although that seems like a simple case of trademark infringement, so let the law decide it.

What I'm against is companies using shock&awe to convince customers to eat their weird concoctions that they have no intention of even continuing.

I didn't mention anything about Hershey

You replied to the comment Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible by saying you preferred it that way.

If there is any copyright infringement, it is on the part of Hershey, who make a vastly inferior product (that cannot legally even be called 'milk chocolate' - it contains no cocoa butter) and try to pass it off as the real thing. Hershey claims on their website that they have 'a license to manufacture Cadbury chocolate products in the United States', but when they change the recipe and keep the same packaging surely they are the ones who are infringing copyright - or at the very least, being downright dishonest.

But Kit Kat - bring it on! As many different flavours and arrangements as possible, please. They're fun, and no one is using 'shock&awe' to convince anyone to buy. My favourite so far has been the maple syrup one, the only one I didn't like was matcha. I'll be keeping an eye out for the bunnies.

Therougou

You replied to the comment Hershey has the USA production rights to the product--and Hershey usually likes to keep the product line as simple as possible by saying you preferred it that way.

We are getting technical here. I think it is pretty obvious I was just saying I like it simple. That has nothing to do with the quality of Hershey's products. In fact, I haven't eaten any Hershey's chocolate for a long while.

If there is any copyright infringement, it is on the part of Hershey, who make a vastly inferior product (that cannot legally even be called 'milk chocolate' - it contains no cocoa butter) and try to pass it off as the real thing. Hershey claims on their website that they have 'a license to manufacture Cadbury chocolate products in the United States', but when they change the recipe and keep the same packaging surely they are the ones who are infringing copyright - or at the very least, being downright dishonest.

Is there some law you can't change the ingredients after buying the rights to a product? I'm not in the food industry, but I don't see how they are doing anything wrong. If you don't want your product altered, don't sell off the rights begin with. Living in Japan, there is a lot of stuff I can't get easily that I would've had in the states. So sorry if I'm not shedding any tears for these people that can't get their "real" Cadbury eggs.

Btw, I like the Matcha Kit-Kats. Original, "Otona" (dark chocolate) or Matcha are all good in my book. These are consistent with the flavors in other chocolate products. But carrot?