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Senior Bucket List

Senior Bucket List


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If you’re graduating, these might be your last few weeks in Philly for a while. Maybe you won’t miss certain things about Philly as you embark on your next endeavor, but there’s on thing you’re certain to miss — the food. Don’t even think about leaving before hitting these spots for must-eats before you say goodbye.

1. Go to Pat’s and Geno’s in the same night and conduct your own cheesesteak taste test.

2. Stop by Reading Terminal Market and wait in line for the classic sandwich from John’s Roast Pork.

Photo by J. Varney

3. Drink the signature “Volcano Hot Chocolate” from the Rim Cafe in the Italian Market.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

4. Head to Chinatown for soup dumplings from Dim Sum Garden.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

5. Try the sashimi tuna tacos from Ippolito’s Seafood.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

6. Make your way to Franklin Fountain and taste the entire menu.

7. Go to Han Dynasty and see if you can handle the hottest rated dish.

Photo by Serious Eats

8. Order a bread basket at Parc for yourself. Ask for extra walnut cranberry bread and don’t share.

9. Eat the bolognese lasagna sandwich at Paesano’s.

10. Munch on a sweet roast pork bun from Mayflower Bakery in Chinatown.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

11. Go to Meltkraft in Reading Terminal Market and eat every grilled cheese they offer. With no hands.

Photo by Amanda Shulman

View the original post, Senior Bucket List, on Spoon University.

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200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


200+ Bucket List Ideas for Retirement

Annuity.org partners with outside experts to ensure we are providing accurate financial content.

These reviewers are industry leaders and professional writers who regularly contribute to reputable publications such as the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

Our expert reviewers review our articles and recommend changes to ensure we are upholding our high standards for accuracy and professionalism.

Our expert reviewers hold advanced degrees and certifications and have years of experience with personal finances, retirement planning and investments.

Usually when people talk about preparing for retirement, they’re referring to their finances. But soon-to-be retirees also need to make sure they’re prepared to transition to the retirement lifestyle. Planning how you’ll spend your days post-career can help you maintain your mental and emotional health, renew your social connections and navigate relationship challenges.

Being job-free can be liberating at first, but it can also be destabilizing. A 2013 study from the Institute of Economic Affairs found that retirement increases the probability of suffering from clinical depression by 40 percent.

“Leaving the workplace doesn’t just mean giving up a paycheck,” says Joe Sweeney, who is the founder and Chief Investment Officer at financial management firm Sweeney & Michel. “For many it’s leaving behind friends, routine, expertise and the excitement of daily challenges.”

Retirees who have a clear plan for rediscovering these things will have an easier time making the most of their post-career years.

“Some questions to ask yourself in preparation: What excites me enough to get out of bed every day? Who will I eat lunch with? What will I do to stay active and healthy? Is this where I want to spend the next 30 years, or should I move?” says Sweeney. “Some people refer to this big step as ‘re-wirement.’ [It’s] a shift in focus.”

Of course, finding activities to enjoy in retirement is often easier said than done. To spark your creativity and help you generate some ideas for retirement, we’ve curated the following bucket lists for seven different personalities. Whether you’re a thrill-seeking adventurer or a book-loving culture maven, a world traveler or a homebody, these bucket lists can help you plan the retirement you’ve always dreamed of.


Watch the video: 50+ things on my senior year bucket list! Back to school (May 2022).